Web of Science Core Collection – Organization Name Searching

Web of Science Core Collection – Organization Name Searching


In this video, we will cover the reasons for searching for organizations, what fields are available to search for organizations, tips for address and organization-enhanced searches, and how to analyze organization search results. Searching for organization names allows us to discover research being done at a university, agency, or company Who is producing that research? What journals are they publishing in? Who are they collaborating with? And it helps us to identify potential partners, collaborators, and competitors. There are two ways to search for an organization. You can use the address field, or the organization-enhanced field. The address field searches the complete author affiliation information as published in the original article. All address information included in an article is searched, so in order to search for a specific institution, you should use the SAME search operator to ensure that all search terms appear in the same address. For example, to search for Miami University of Ohio, you should search for Miami Univ SAME OH, or you may receive a record with author affiliations at Miami University in Florida and at various institutions in Ohio. Searching by address is useful if you know exactly how the institution appears in the paper you are searching for. However, many institutions publish under a variety of names, so you may not retrieve all possible records using this method. Most major research organizations produce scholarly literature associated with multiple campuses, departments and research centers. When authors publish papers, they may use any number of different names to refer to their organization, even though they are all affiliated with one, parent institution. When we add these papers to the Web of Science, we use the institutional names provided by the authors. As an example, authors at Columbia University have listed that institution in all of the following ways. All of these variations appear in the Web of Science. Let’s imagine we want to use the Web of Science to find all of the papers written by authors at this institution. To accomplish this, searching all of these variants in the Address field would be required.
Simply searching for “Columbia” may have missed papers by authors that used these name variants,
and would have retrieved papers by authors at a number of unrelated organizations mixed in with the desired results. Although refining and analyzing allow you to narrow these results, achieving a comprehensive, precise search that
includes all desired variations and excludes the false hits would involve a complex, multi-step process. The solution to this problem is address unification. Extensive work has been done to unify organization variants – those that are parent/child relationships with associated organizations, acronyms of full organization names, and even simple misspellings. A new search field called Organization-Enhanced has been added to the Web of Science to search these Preferred and Variant names. Over 4,000 organizations have been unified and work is ongoing to unify more. The publications associated with these institutions account for over 35 million records in Web of Science. Contact technical support to inquire about having your institution unified. To use this tool, select the Organization-Enhanced field from the drop-down menu, and click the “Select from Index” link, which will open the search aid. You can either browse organizations from the alphabetical list, or search for a particular institution. For this demonstration, I’ll search for Columbia. Clicking Find will produce a list of preferred and unified names to choose from. I see Columbia University in the list. I can either click ADD to go ahead and select this Preferred name, or click the D button for details on the variant institutions within Columbia University. I’ll click D and examine the variants. Columbia University appears at the top because it is the preferred name. If I select this option for my search all the name variants listed below will be included. If I’m only interested in a subset of Columbia’s research, I can select the appropriate variants below. The search builder at the bottom of the page will reflect the variant names I’ve selected and associate them with Columbia University. When I’m finished I click OK to bring these selected search terms back to the search page. In this example I’ve chosen to search the preferred/unified name, Columbia University, to see a comprehensive list of all of Columbia’s research. Click the search button to see a list of results. Results will contain items from all of the unified variant names, and the preferred name will appear on the record alongside the variant. For example, records like this one where Columbia University is mentioned explicitly, as well as records that list a variant name, such as this one which lists the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. If you’re interested in having your institution’s name variants unified within the Web of Science, or would like to suggest a correction, contact the customer Technical Support team. Preferred organization names can also be used to refine and analyze search results. For example, I’m searching for articles on ‘cardiomyopathy’ and want to find out what organizations are producing research in that field. I type cardiomyopathy in the Topic field and click Search. I have a list of results on cardiomyopathy and can view the associated organizations in the Refine Results panel on the left. Harvard University and University of California System are the two top-producing organizations in this results set. I could select one or more of these institutions to Refine my search. Or, if I’m interested in a more detailed analysis, I can click the Analyze Results button. With ‘Analyze Results’ you can choose to analyze by either the preferred/unified names, or the non-unified names. Choose Organization-Enhanced for unified names or choose Organization to analyze by non-unified names. I’m choosing Organization because I want to see if there are research centers within larger organizations that are doing cardiomyopathy research. I’ll click Analyze. The analysis is produced,
and in the results I see Harvard University but also the associated Brigham and Women’s Hospital, which is one of Harvard’s name variants and an affiliate organization, listed separately. If I want to focus on their research I can select Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and click View Records. In summary, it is best to use the Organization-Enhanced search aid to obtain the best results for a preferred name. Searches that are typed manually into the Organization-Enhanced field will search non-unified address information if the preferred name is not entered exactly as it appears in the search aid. The search aid structures the query correctly for optimal results. The Address field is an alternative field to be used for searching non-unified organization names as well as geographic information like city name, state abbreviation, country name, or postal code. When using the Analyze results feature, choose Organization to analyze non-unified Address data.

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